Home » Issues » Articles » Who’s Afraid of the Temple? By Moshe Feiglin

Who’s Afraid of the Temple? By Moshe Feiglin

This Tisha B’Av, as usual, I felt uncomfortable with the Kinot, which have become nothing more than lip service. We are actually in love with destruction. We have exchanged the essence of the Temple Mount for the Western Wall, the candy for the wrapper and the purpose of the lamentations for the lamentations, themselves. The longing for the Temple that kept us whole as a nation during 2000 years of exile and returned us to our land and our state, has somehow morphed into a horror show in the minds of too many Jews – both secular and religious.

The secular have been brainwashed to believe that the Temple – the source of world peace and stability – will create a world war. The religious think – rightfully – that the Temple will destroy their religion. In other words, the Temple will extricate Judaism from its narrow, religious, detached-from-reality framework and restore it to its original, all-encompassing stature. Judaism will then be part of every facet of life, from the most mundane and personal to the most sublime and universal. The religious are not enthusiastic about that. The Zionist Jews have become used to the separation between holy and mundane (the complete opposite of their declared ideology) and the ultra-Orthodox have become used to being detached from the mundane. Everybody is quite comfortable in their own shallow and murky ponds.

The Temple threatens everybody’s world. It sanctifies everything. And due to the fears of the observant Jews, it still lies in destruction. Only because of the fears of the observant Jews.
In a visit some time ago to the Temple Mount, we met some of the paratroopers who had liberated Jerusalem in the Six Day War. “It looks like you will have to re-capture the Temple Mount,” I said to one of them. “We’re ready and waiting for orders,” the aging veteran answered with a smile.

With G-d’s help, we will soon have authentic Jewish leadership that will issue those orders.

Moshe Feiglin

Illustration courtesy of The Temple Institute

POST_TAGGED_WITH,,

3 Responses so far.

  1. Elliotu says:

    Thank you Moshe Feiglin for writing what you did. I hope this is not just a one time article on why we have not rebuilt the temple. I too have felt that the ceremony of mourning for the temple with fasting and praying has taken the place of really wanting the recreation of the temple. I get the feeling that if the temple were to rebuilt tommorrow, the religious community would not recognize it and would continue its mourning process because that has replaced what really is most important: Temple number 3. Now people look at the Temple as pipe dream but let us not forget. For thousands of years people looked at returning to Israel as a pipe dream. At first the religious community did not recognize it and many parts of the community still will not say hallel on Yom Haatzmaut even today. What is sad is that because the Temple is a religious object, no one but the frum community will take any steps toward rebuilding it and that is extremely sad. The non religious do not see the need for it. Now if we can show the non religious world or even the non Jewish world what having the temple will do for them by increasing tourism, etc, then maybe we have a fighting chance of seeing temple 3 in our lifetimes.

  2. vivarto says:

    Well, Moshe, do you really think that God needs Jews to slaughter red heifers for him?

    The animal sacrifice is a part of a very primitive stage of development of our religious consciousness.

    The true Torah is a living book and it is being written every day. Yet the religious year to live in the Bronze Age.

    If the Temple were to be the place for highest spiritual learning, then I’d support it. But a divine slaughterhouse is just as disgusting as a bunch of Muhammadan savages shouting “Allahu-Akbar”

  3. […] ”In other words, the Temple will extricate Judaism from its narrow, religious, detached-from-reality framework and restore it to its original, all-encompassing stature. Judaism will then be part of every facet of life, from the most mundane and personal to the most sublime and universal. The religious are not enthusiastic about that.” (From Moshe Feiglin’s article, ”Who’s Afraid of the Temple”) […]

You must be logged in to post a comment.